Personal Space Weather Station

The Personal Space Weather Station project ultimately aims to create a small, multi-instrument system that can make ground-based measurements of the space environment.  The observations from this project will not only be useful to the owner of the system, but also aggregated into a central database for space science and space weather research purporses. Initial work focuses on the development of a scientific-grade high frequency (HF) radio receiver, as well as the necessary software and network infrastructure. This project is led by the New Jersey Institute of Technology Center for Solar Terrestrial Research (NJIT-CSTR) in collaboration with the Massachusettes Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory and the Tucson Amateur Packet Radio, Inc. (TAPR).

Get Involved

Want to be involved? Most development is currently taking place through the TAPR TangerineSDR project, a software designed radio project that is supporting the PSWS.

Articles

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The TangerineSDR is the TAPR-HamSCI joint project to create a software defined radio that meets the joint needs of the amateur and scientific communities. The TangerineSDR is slated to be at the heart of the high-performance version of the HamSCI Personal Space Weather Station. In his January/February 2020 QEX article, TangerineSDR Chief Architect Scotty Cowling WA2DFI explains the requirements and use cases of the TangerineSDR. Full text of the article is availble here. Reprinted with permission; copyright ARRL.

HamSCI has an opening for a Post-Doctoral Research Associate! Please see the advertisement below.

The University of Scranton Department of Physics and Engineering seeks a post-doctoral research associate starting in Spring/Summer 2020 in support of a recently awarded NSF-supported Distributed Array of Small Instruments (DASI) grant to develop a prototype Personal Space Weather Station. The successful post-doctoral researcher will conduct software development, and subsequent scientific studies, for a multi-site geographically distributed high frequency (HF; 3 – 30 MHz) software defined radio (SDR) network using signals of opportunity.  Primary responsibilities will involve the development and implementation of an ionospheric sounding algorithm using the HF observation network for the purpose of studying geospace phenomena: traveling ionospheric disturbances, ionospheric responses to solar flares, geomagnetic storms and substorms, and other space weather effects. The ideal candidate will have expertise in ionospheric remote sensing, geospace physics including the ionosphere and thermosphere, and digital signal processing algorithm development and implementation.

A $1.3 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant awarded to University of Scranton physics and electrical engineering professor Nathaniel Frissell, Ph.D., seeks to harness the power of a network of licensed amateur radio operators to better understand and measure the effects of weather in the upper levels of Earth’s atmosphere. The highly-competitive grant awarded by NSF’s Aeronomy Program for the project titled Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments (DASI) will be implemented over a three-year period. As lead principal investigator, Dr. Frissell, a space physicist, will lead a collaborative team that will develop modular, multi-instrument, ground-based space science observation equipment and data collection and analysis software. He will also recruit multiple universities and ham radio users to operate the network of “Personal Space Weather Stations” developed.